Manali:

At an altitude of 2,050 m (6,726 ft) in the Beas RiverValley is a hill station nestled in the mountains of the Indianstate of Himachal Pradesh near the northern end of the Kullu Valley. It is located about 270 km (168 mi) north of the state capital, Shimla. Manali lies in Kullu district of Himachal Pradesh state of India. It has become a tourist spot in recent years.
Manali with a population of approx. 30,000 is administratively a part of the Kullu district. The small town is the beginning of an ancient trade route to Ladakh and from there over the Karakoram Pass on to Yarkand and Khotan in the Tarim Basin.

Geography:

Manali is located at 32.2396 N, 77.1887 E, about 40 km (25 mi) north of Kullu town. The town ranges in elevation from 1,800 m (5,900 ft) to 2,000 m (6,600 ft) in the uppermost "Old Manali" section.

Demographics:

Manali is a small town with a population originating from around India. As of 2001 India census,[1]Manali had an official population of 6,265. Males constituted 64% of the population and females 36%. Manali had an average literacy rate of 74%, higher than the national average of 59.5%: male literacy was 80%, and female literacy was 63%. 9% of the population was under six years of age.

Climate:

The climate in Manali is predominantly cold during winters, and moderately cool during summers. The temperatures range from 4 °C (39 °F) to 20 °C (68 °F) over the year. The average temperature during summer is between 04 °C (39 °F) and 15 °C (59 °F), and between −15 °C (5 °F) and 05 °C (41 °F) in the winter.

Monthly precipitation varies between 31 mm (1.2 in) in November to 217 mm (8.5 in) in July. In average, some 45 mm (1.8 in) of precipitation is received during winter and spring months, increasing to some 115 mm (4.5 in) in summer as the monsoon approaches. The average total annual precipitation is 1,363 mm (53.7 in). Snowfall often takes place between November end to early February. The weather in manali is not stable.

Etymology:

Vashishta Temple, Manali:

Manali is among top Indian skiing destinations.Manali is named after the Hindu lawgiver Manu. The word Manali is regarded as the changed name of "Manu-Alaya" which literally means "the abode of Manu". Legend has it that sage Manu stepped off his ark in Manali to recreate human life after a great flood had deluged the world. Manali is also often referred to as the "Valley of the Gods". The Old Manali village has an ancient temple dedicated to sage Manu.

History:

In ancient times, the valley was sparsely populated by nomadic hunters known as 'rakshas'. The next arrivals were the shepherds who arrived from the Kangra Valley and settled to take up agriculture. Some of the earliest inhabitants of the region are the 'naur' or 'nar', which is a caste unique to the Kullu valley. Only a few naur families are known to exist now. A naur family in the village Soyal near Haripur on the west bank of Manali was famous for the vast land they owned and their practice of having 'rakshas' as their labourers.
The British introduced apple trees and trout, The first apple orchard was set up by Britishers near patlikulh which were earlier not native to Manali flora and fauna. It is said that when apple trees were first planted the fruits were so plentiful that often branches, unable to bear the weight, would collapse. To this day, apple—along with plum and pear—remains the best source of income for the majority of its inhabitants.
Tourism in Manali received a boost after the rise of militancy in Kashmir in the late 1980s. This once quiet village was transformed into a bustling town with many hotels and restaurants. 

Ladakh:

Ladakh is part of Jammu & Kashmir and it is frequently referred to as the "Switzerland of Asia" - actually "there is no place like the serene Ladakh in Switzerland - correction, anywhere else on Earth." Every expedition from Ladakh follows spectacular routes patronized by the people of this difficult terrain for hundreds of years.

Ladakh is famed for its high passes, brackish water lakes, a stunning lunar-like landscape, a Buddhist culture warped in time, deep blue endless skies, and a landscape that is larger than life. It is an adventure-seeker's paradise. Many have said Ladakh is the most beautiful place in the world, but we seek a beauty even more surreal and attempt one of the most celebrated, difficult and exquisite treks of the region.